• Kleinert Foundation

Weekly Reader June 21, 2019

Updated: Oct 9, 2019

By: Hannah Rabalais, Program Officer


1. Brittany Barnett: Uniting Incarcerated Mothers with Their Daughters

By: Dallas Doing Good, Katie Kelton


"When Brittany Barnett was 22 years old, she witnessed her mother enter into incarceration for an underlying drug addiction. Although already a young adult, the experience greatly impacted Brittany and her younger sister, spurring her to consider how much more traumatic it would be if she were younger and still in her mother’s care. Thankfully, her mother found the strength to undergo rehabilitation and now works as a drug recovery nurse, but this is not the story for all currently-incarcerated women."


Read full article here: https://www.dallasdoinggood.com/doing-good/brittany-barnett-reconciling-incarcerated-mothers


2. ‘Yes In God’s Backyard’ Seeks Affordable Housing On Religious Land

By: KPBS, Andrew Bowen


"Several years ago, the congregation of Clairemont Lutheran Church had an idea: The planned redevelopment of their fellowship hall was slowly moving through San Diego's approval process. Perhaps they could speed things up if they agreed to include affordable housing.

The idea was somewhat unconventional, but the church was hearing city leaders talk more and more about the need for affordable housing and felt they could help.

The redeveloped fellowship hall is now nearing final approval, but the housing is still in the idea phase. Yet church leaders and a small group of advocates are persevering in hopes that the housing can serve as a proof of concept project to be replicated by other faith communities across the county."


Read full article here: https://www.kpbs.org/news/2019/jun/05/yigby-affordable-housing-church-parking-lots/?fbclid=IwAR38iVkBRAYueD9PQHy9SwZMJCbq3ur2ltQw50E3_Lj9WJ1pcOcrCEqcbtc


3. Making Places for Everyone — With Everyone

By: SSIR, Kimberly Burrowes


"There are lessons for policymakers and community developers to address the barriers to racial equity and inclusion at the local level, which in turn can shape global identity. Placemaking can be effective in bringing together the community as primary beneficiaries for development. To promote its use, the field should invest in more instruments for measuring the impact of place-based activities, and encourage local leaders to put more funds into this community development approach. With considered and inclusive planning processes, placemaking can not only revive our cities, but also improve the lives of all their residents.


Read full article here: https://ssir.org/articles/entry/making_places_for_everyone_with_everyone?utm_source=Enews&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=SSIR_Now&utm_content=Title


4. If Strategy Is So Important, Why Don’t We Make Time for It?

By: Harvard Business Review, Dorie Clark


"First, it’s important to remember that strategic thinking doesn’t necessarily require large amounts of time; it’s not about taking endless sabbaticals or going on leadership retreats. As productivity expert David Allen told me when I interviewed him for my book Stand Out, “You don’t need time to have a good idea, you need space…. It takes zero time to have an innovative idea or to make a decision, but if you don’t have psychic space, those things are not necessarily impossible, but they’re suboptimal.”


Read full article here: https://hbr.org/2018/06/if-strategy-is-so-important-why-dont-we-make-time-for-it?utm_source=linkedin&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=hbr


5. ‘Ex-offenders Matter’

By: The Atlantic, Emily Buder


"After Maryam Henderson-Uloho was convicted of obstruction of justice, she was sentenced to 25 years in a Louisiana prison. Ultimately, she served 13 years—spending more than half of that time in solitary confinement. When she was released, she felt dehumanized.

“You see, in prison, you’re broken—mentally, emotionally, and physically,” Henderson-Uloho says in the short documentary Sister Hearts. “I didn’t know what to do. I was alone. I was scared. I had no one.” An ex-felon, Henderson-Uloho was unable to open a bank account or a credit card. She couldn’t rent an apartment. Nobody would employ her. “I had to go inside myself and find something good about me,” she says. “I felt like trash … I needed help.”

On a street corner, Henderson-Uloho began selling discarded clothing items out of a suitcase. The first day, she made $40. “I just kept doing that,” she says in the film. “Three years later, I have a 15,000-square-foot thrift store and transition-housing facility for other female ex-offenders.”


Read full article here: https://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/591364/sister-hearts/


ABOUT US

Founded in June of 2017 by Ashlee and Chris Kleinert, The Kleinert Foundation is a private family foundation with the mission to understand and address social issues with a focus on sex trafficking and vulnerable populations in our community.

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